Posts

Es werden Posts vom 2018 angezeigt.

Wonder Woman: Warbringer (DC Icons #1)

Bild
Wonder Woman: Warbringer (DC Icons #1) by Leigh Bardugo
Blurb:
Princess Diana longs to prove herself to her legendary warrior sisters. But when the opportunity finally comes, she throws away her chance at glory and breaks Amazon law – risking exile – to save a mortal. Diana will soon learn that she has rescued no ordinary girl, and that with this single brave act, she may have doomed the world.
Review:
"What's a supermodel?" Diana asked.
Nim stared at her.
"Uh, Diana's homeschooled," said Alia.
"Under a rock?" asked Nim.
Confession time: I'm not a particular fan of Wonder Woman. I don't have anything against her but I also just don't think she's that interesting. Maybe it's seeing images of her comic as a kid and thinking that she looked useless compared to all the awesome female warriors I had read about in fantasy books (and also compared to her male companions - a Lasso of Truth? how stupid that sounded to me especially because she …

The Foxhole Court (All for the Game #1)

Bild
The Foxhole Court (All for the Game #1) by Nora Sakavic
Blurb:
Neil Josten is the newest addition to the Palmetto State University Exy team. He's short, he's fast, he's got a ton of potential—and he's the runaway son of the murderous crime lord known as The Butcher.
Signing a contract with the PSU Foxes is the last thing a guy like Neil should do. The team is high profile and he doesn't need sports crews broadcasting pictures of his face around the nation. His lies will hold up only so long under this kind of scrutiny and the truth will get him killed.
But Neil's not the only one with secrets on the team. One of Neil's new teammates is a friend from his old life, and Neil can't walk away from him a second time. Neil has survived the last eight years by running. Maybe he's finally found someone and something worth fighting for.
Review:
This was a weird book for me. Really weird. The kind of weird where I finished it and I wasn't sure whether I like…

Tonight the Streets Are Ours

Bild
Tonight the Streets Are Ours by Leila Sales
Blurb:
Recklessly loyal.
That's how seventeen-year-old Arden Huntley has always thought of herself. Caring for her loved ones is what gives Arden purpose in her life and makes her feel like she matters. But lately she’s grown resentful of everyone—including her needy best friend and her absent mom—taking her loyalty for granted.
Then Arden stumbles upon a website called Tonight the Streets Are Ours, the musings of a young New York City writer named Peter, who gives voice to feelings that Arden has never known how to express. He seems to get her in a way that no one else does, and he hasn’t even met her.
Until Arden sets out on a road trip to find him.

Review:
Likeall stories, the one you are about to read is a love story.
If it wasn't, what would be the point?
These are the opening words to Tonight the Streets Are Ours and they certainly don't lie. But, as one might expect from the way they are bluntly put in the beginning of the bo…

By Your Side

Bild
By Your Side by Kasie West
Blurb:
When Autumn Collins finds herself accidentally locked in the library for an entire weekend, she doesn’t think things could get any worse. But that’s before she realizes that Dax Miller is locked in with her. Autumn doesn’t know much about Dax except that he’s trouble. Between the rumors about the fight he was in (and that brief stint in juvie that followed it) and his reputation as a loner, he’s not exactly the ideal person to be stuck with. Still, she just keeps reminding herself that it is only a matter of time before Jeff, her almost-boyfriend, realizes he left her in the library and comes to rescue her.
Only he doesn’t come. No one does.

Review:
"There should be no rules in our world," he said.
"You're right. That will be rule number three."
Honestly, there is nothing much left to say about any Kasie West book that I haven't already said. Especially, because this is a perfect example of her run-of-the-mill and perfectly fine…

Trouble Never Sleeps (Trouble #3)

Bild
Trouble Never Sleeps (Trouble #3) by Stephanie Tromly
Blurb:
No one makes getting into trouble look as good as Philip Digby—and he looks good doing it. Now that he's back in town, he's plunged Zoe (and their Scooby Gang of wealthy frenemy Sloane, nerd-tastic genius Felix, and aw-shucks-handsome Henry) back into the deep end on the hunt for his kidnapped sister. He's got a lead, but it involves doing a deal with the scion of an alarmingly powerful family, not to mention committing some light treason. Zoe and Digby are officially together now, and she's definitely up for whatever closure this new caper might offer, even though this mystery will come with a twist neither expected.

Review:
When we walked in, mom said, "Hello, Digby. Welcome to dinner. I made your favorite." She waved at the dining table. "Food."
If you are anything like me and you've been in love with this series and have been dying for this last instalment to hit (your) shelf, then I ha…

I Believe in a Thing Called Love

Bild
I Believe in a Thing Called Love by Maurene Goo
Blurb:
Desi Lee believes anything is possible if you have a plan. That's how she became student body president. Varsity soccer star. And it's how she'll get into Stanford. But she's never had a boyfriend. In fact, she's a disaster at romance, a clumsy, stammering humiliation magnet whose botched attempts at flirting have become legendary with her friends. So when the hottest human specimen to have ever lived walks into her life one day, Desi finds guidance in the Korean dramas her father has been obsessively watching for years—where the hapless heroine always seems to end up in the arms of her true love by episode ten. It's a simple formula, and Desi is a quick study. Armed with her "K Drama Steps to True Love," Desi goes after the moody, elusive artist Luca Drakos—and boat rescues, love triangles, and staged car crashes ensue. But when the fun and games turn to true feels, Desi finds out that real love is…

Human Acts

Bild
Human Acts by Han Kang (translated by Deborah Smith)
Blurb:
In the midst of a violent student uprising in South Korea, a young boy named Dong-ho is shockingly killed.
Review:
You look around at the old man. You don’t ask him if this is his granddaughter. You wait, patiently, for him to speak when he’s ready. There will be no forgiveness. You look into his eyes, which are flinching from the sight laid out in front of them as though it is the most appalling thing in all this world. There will be no forgiveness. Least of all for me.
My opinion is split when it comes to Human Acts. On the one hand the writing style is absolutely beautiful and I was in awe all the while reading it, on the other hand I struggled a lot to connect with this story.

The story this book tells is an important one. I hardly know anything about Korean history - frankly, I still hardly know anything about the events described - thus, this book seems like an important wake-up call or at least reminder of the fact that ther…

Exit, Pursued by a Bear

Bild
Exit, Pursued by a Bear by E. K. Johnston
Blurb:
Hermione Winters is captain of her cheerleading team, and in tiny Palermo Heights, this doesn't mean what you think it means. At PHHS, the cheerleaders don't cheer for the sports teams; they are the sports team – the pride and joy of a tiny town. The team's summer training camp is Hermione's last and marks the beginning of the end of … she's not sure what. She does know this season could make her a legend. But during a camp party, someone slips something in her drink. And it all goes black.
Review:
I didn't used to overthink my choice quite so much. Then someone made what I've always been told is a very important choice for me, and now I tend to overthink everything else. 
In a central plot point Exit, Pursued by a Bear is similar to What We Saw (both are about rape) but, when it comes down to it, both books are completely different. What We Saw treated rape from an outsider's perspective, here we follow the v…

What We Saw

Bild
What We Saw by Aaron Hartzler
Blurb:
The party at John Doone's last Saturday night is a bit of a blur. Kate Weston can piece together most of the details: Stacey Stallard handing her shots, Ben Cody taking her keys and getting her home early … But when a picture of Stacey passed out over Deacon Mills' shoulder appears online the next morning, Kate suspects she doesn't have all the details. When Stacey levels charges against four of Kate's classmates, the whole town erupts into controversy. Facts that can't be ignored begin to surface, and every answer Kate finds leads back to the same question: Who witnessed what happened to Stacey? And what responsibility do they have to speak up about what they saw?
Review:
"Why do you like birds so much?" I asked.
A look of pity flitted over her face, followed by a smile. "Because they can fly, silly."
This is not an easy book, but I didn't expect it to be. To be honest, I had totally forgotten what it was abou…

Love, Life, and the List

Bild
Love, Life, and the List by Kasie West
Blurb:

Seventeen-year-old Abby Turner's summer isn't going the way she'd planned. She has a not-so-secret but definitely unrequited crush on her best friend, Cooper. She hasn't been able to manage her mother's growing issues with anxiety. And now she's been rejected from an art show because her work "has no heart." So when she gets another opportunity to show her paintings Abby isn't going to take any chances.  Which is where the list comes in. Abby gives herself one month to do ten things, ranging from face a fear (#3) to learn a stranger’s story (#5) to fall in love (#8). She knows that if she can complete the list she’ll become the kind of artist she’s always dreamed of being. But as the deadline approaches, Abby realizes that getting through the list isn’t as straightforward as it seems… and that maybe—just maybe—she can’t change her art if she isn’t first willing to change herself.

Review:
I knew I'd hav…

How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia

Bild
How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia by Mohsin Hamid
Blurb: (The bad news: I can't find a decent blurb for this book. More bad news: I can't make up a decent blurb for it either - anything I could come up with would do injustice to the story/storytelling. The good news: my edition uses as "blurb" an excerpt from the very beginning (it's from the second page) which works decently as an introduction not only to the story but also to the storytelling. Thus, I'll just cite that same excerpt and pretend like it's a blurb.)
This book is a self-help book. Its objective, as it says on the cover, is to show you how to get filthy rich in rising Asia. And to do that it has to find you, huddled, shivering, on the packed earth under your mother's cot one cold, dewy morning. Your anguish is the anguish of a boy whose chocolate has been thrown away, whose remote controls are out of batteries, whose scooter is busted, whose new sneakers have been stolen. This is all th…

The Fill-In Boyfriend

Bild
The Fill-In Boyfriend by Kasie West
Blurb:

When Gia Montgomery's boyfriend, Bradley, dumps her in the parking lot of her high school prom, she has to think fast. After all, she'd been telling her friends about him for months now. This was supposed to be the night she proved he existed. So when she sees a cute guy waiting to pick up his sister, she enlists his help. The task is simple: be her fill-in boyfriend – two hours, zero commitment, a few white lies. After that, she can win back the real Bradley. The problem is that days after prom, it's not the real Bradley she's thinking about, but the stand-in. 
Review:
"You know what we've succeeded in going with this game?"
"What's that?"
"Increasing the anticipation."
He laughed. "I know, right? Can I just be fill-in Bradley forever?"
The Fill-In Boyfriend is exactly what I've come to expect from a Kasie West book (which is great because it totally served its purpose) but nothing …

Stories I Recently Consumed #Throwback

Bild
Omg, it has been a while, hasn't it? I always try to be good about my blog but then a new semester comes round and before I know it I don't post anything at all anymore (not quite but almost). This semester is especially bad because of many reasons such as 1. I've got particularly many things going on in my private life (for example: I'm going to see my first climbing worldcup in real life next weekend - I'm so hyped you don't even understand), 2. I've got particularly many things going on in my student life (not many courses but, oh boy, most of them sure are important!), 3. Connected with that: I've got particularly many books to read for my courses and I dislike writing actual reviews for those books, etc. So, I've basically thrown overboard the "monthly reading throwback" thing and I am instead making this a "recent stories" throwback. A lot more convenient. Also, I won't even be writing full reviews for all of the non-u…

The Child Finder

Bild
The Child Finder by Rene Denfeld
Blurb:
Three years ago, Madison Culver disappeared when her family was choosing a Christmas tree in Oregon's Skookum National Forest. She would be eight-years-old now – if she has survived. Desperate to find their beloved daughter, certain someone took her, the Culvers turn to Naomi, a private investigator with an uncanny talent for locating the lost and missing. Known to the police and a select group of parents as "the Child Finder," Naomi is their last hope.
Naomi's methodical search takes her deep into the icy, mysterious forest in the Pacific Northwest, and into her own fragmented past. She understands children like Madison because once upon a time, she was a lost girl, too.
As Naomi relentlessly pursues and slowly uncovers the truth behind Madison’s disappearance, shards of a dark dream pierce the defenses that have protected her, reminding her of a terrible loss she feels but cannot remember. If she finds Madison, will Naomi ultim…